I've moved the blog!

I've moved my blog to www.coolcatteacher.com as well as all of the posts from this blog. Learn more...
Showing posts with label digitalcitizenship. Show all posts
Showing posts with label digitalcitizenship. Show all posts

Monday, April 02, 2012

Location Based Safety Guide



Privacy is a freedom we give ourselves.

It is spring break. Facebook is full of my friends saying where they are (with their whole families), and it looks like most of them are posting publicly. Someone could easily look at the Camilla, Georgia and publicly see who is out of town.

Location Based Girl-Finding App Uses FourSquare and Facebook

Girls Around Me, the app that used Foursquare and Facebook location data to reveal the whereabouts of girls located around a person, had people upset. It is now pulled from the iTunes store after losing Foursquare API access. The Russian-based developer told the Wall Street Journal that:

"Girls Around Me does not provide any data that is unavailable to the user when he uses his or her social network account, nor does it reveal any data that users did not share with others."


Is Sharing Your Location a Big Deal?

The fact is that girls and adults ARE sharing this information. Websites like pleaserobme have tried to point this out for some time. (Amid criticism pleaserobme creates awareness about whose homes are abandoned via the location-enabled Tweets by owners disclosing their absence.) 


A Wired News  reporter determined where a woman lived by watching her take pictures in the park. By noticing the kind of camera, he used the location feature in Flickr and the camera model to find her and locate her apartment through other photos on the account.


Google is now forcing people to use real names, which makes stalking even easier. This person makes an excellent point about Google forcing her to use her real name or suspend her services by April 4. Companies like Google want to make sure we're a real person, but we live in a world where 1 in 20 women will be stalked in their lifetime. I am one of those women. This is important to me that other women not live in that kind of fear.


When I see people posting things like:


"We're so happy to be gone to the beach for a week" along with the location -or-"The mountains are so pretty! Our dogs are at the vet.  Ah, a week alone in the mountains!  I don't want to go home." 


I cringe when I see these are PUBLIC updates on Facebook that anyone can see.


When you share your updates, perhaps you should create a list of close friends you trust to share your location based updates.


Tip #1: Create an intimate list if you want to share location based information.

I would suggest that you create a list of close friends (who genuinely are close) or just family members to share these geotagged updates. 


Tip #2: Look closely at how you link other platforms.

Privacy settings do not transfer between platforms. The updates you send from Foursquare, Twitter, TripIt, or Yelp to Facebook may override your Facebook privacy settings. I admit that I don't honestly have a firm handle on this one yet. For example, I've decided to use Foursquare when I'm traveling to check into airports and meet up with friends or to get deals at certain locations. Meanwhile, I'm researching my privacy settings for each as part of writing this post.


Tip #3: NEVER check into or create a location for your home, hotel room, or other private locations.

You are giving the latitude and longitude of your home - where you live - to anyone who is your friend.


Tip #4: Turn off geotagging on photos (and check your child's cell phone) unless you intentionally decide geotagging is for you.

I don't want my photos geotagged. A geotag is a tiny piece of data with the latitude and longitude of the photo's location. Many parents don't realize that their children's cell phones often default to turn on geotagging. When a child takes a photo with a geotag and shares it anywhere electronically, they have just compromised their own safety.


By 2012 (that is now), all cell phones in the US are required to have geolocation for E911 purposes. Because most cell phones have cameras, the geotagging is available. I think that the use of geotagging on children's photos should be disclosed to parents. As of right now, it is likely that most parents don't know if it is on or off.


Remember that apps like Google Picasa can add Geotags to a photo AFTER it is taken (by adding the photos on a Google map, for example.) Educating everyone about geotagging is paramount for this reason.


Tip #5: Carefully vet your friends

If you don't know someone, YOU DON'T KNOW THEM. Why would you friend them? I stopped friending people on Facebook I don't know and created a fan page instead. This also means I need to go back and unfriend those I don't know. This is such a hard one because on Foursquare it is tempting to friend the "friends of friends."


Don't trust your friends to vet your friends.

I had 2 sets of students do an experiment last year for their Digiteen project. They created two fake profiles. One was for a "cute' girl with a real picture, and another was for a random young man with an avatar. The girl had over 500 friends after 3 weeks. Although students admitted that they didn't know the girl that she didn't go to our small school, they said, "so many people had friended her, I just thought it was OK." Only one student "called her out" and we quickly reached out to him to make him a confederate. It was part of an awareness of "watch who you friend" that the students wanted to do. All an evildoer has to do is have a picture of a cute young lady and enlist a few confederates.


Go back through your friends and check what you are doing. Separate them into lists if necessary. Create a "not sure" list and give them limited viewing rights to your Facebook.


Tip #6: Carefully look at your settings

Check your privacy settings everywhere you share. Some of the most popular geolocating services and information on their privacy settings are:

Tip #7: Be careful about revealing patterns in your behavior

When strangers know your routine, you create a risk for yourself. Do you always get coffee at a certain place and jog in another place every day? (Location enabled sites like Map My Run let you share the map of where you like to run. This may also be something  you don't want to share publicly.)

Tip #8: Don't Geotag photos including children

I think it is a  poor idea to geotag photos including children. It is our job to protect them.

What does this mean for photos taken at events that your school hosts? Has this been disclosed to parents? How can we educate about this?

Tip #9: Educate

Educate those you know about location based safety.

 You and your children are only as safe as  the "weakest link." When we go on our family trips, I purposely don't mention it on any of the social media websites where I share. I only upload photos after the trip.

This should be part of the digital citizenship education programs (we talk about it in Digiteen) that all of you should be doing in your schools. Talk to parents about it when you start the year. 

Fear isn't the answer

I'm not and advocate fear-induced education. We can educate people and advocate for businesses to protect people by promoting awareness. Location based services should always be an opt-in privacy setting (meaning you should have to CHOOSE to enable them) and companies who are going to work in location based services MUST be vigilant about removing stalker-ish apps like Girls Around Me.

With face recognition as it is, I think that most photography services could detect a child is in a photo and should set privacy to a level that doesn't allow public sharing. (Increasingly accurate facial recognition adds a whole new element of concern to the use of location based services.)

We need to be talking about location based apps now and using some common sense before the inevitable things begin happening. I could hide from my stalker in college. In today's world, I could have given up so much privacy before he fixated on me that I literally wouldn't have a place to hide.

Privacy is a freedom we give ourselves.

----------------------------
As always, educate yourself. These are my recommendations as to what I'm doing, you are responsible for the safety of you, your children, and your students. Take time to look into this for yourself. Let this guide be the beginning of your education journey.


Photo credit: Big Stock

Further Reading:

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

When You Join -- Show Good Netiquette



Join Well
Approving people in spaces takes a bit of time. It is so important to know that when you ask to join a wiki or Diigo group or grouped on Linked in that you let the person approving you KNOW why you want to join.

When You Don't
If you don't, you force the person approving to go through and look at your profile to determine if you are a spammer. Sure, a spammer can lie, but usually they just don't put why!

How to Get "Accepted"
If someone puts a message:

"Vicki, I heard about this group in a Diigo presentation you did at ISTE last year."

Peg board setImage via Wikipedia
BANG they are approved immediately. But if they put nothing, I wait until I have time which is usually once a month for the Diigo educators group.


If you are upset that you're not getting approved to join things more quickly, maybe it is because you aren't identifying yourself and why you want to join. People who identify why they want to join a space are showing good citizenship and technology savvy and are the kind of people that are wanted in communities.


Teaching the Netiquette of Joining Spaces
When my students join the wikis for our projects, I require that they put a comment when they ask to join. This is good netiquette.

This is one reason why I don't set up wikis for professional development ahead of time - or at least I don't issue joining invitations. I WANT those in the room to see me approving and I want to mention specifically those who comment when they join and show how it looks on my end. I do this with my students so they will learn the netiquette of joining.
Enhanced by Zemanta

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Will You Unwire for a Day? Please issue the challenge and take our survey.



I have two very amazing young men looking over my shoulder as I write this post. They have a challenge and some questions to ask you and your students.

We are looking for people and students who are willing to UNWIRE for a day. That's right. One whole day! Now, if you need to use technology for work/school that is ok. But, besides that we want your cell phone off, your xbox off, and even your TV off for a day.

Are you and your students willing to take the challenge?

Why or why not? Either way we want you to fill out our survey!

They would like as many people as possible to take the challenge and fill out their survey between now and next Monday at 8:15 am Eastern.

If you're NOT willing - go ahead and fill out the survey. If you are willing, come back and fill out this survey AFTER you have completed the challenge! (even if you fail) What do you think your students will say?

This is part of our Digiteen Action project.

Monday, March 28, 2011

The Case for Digital Citizenship in Schools



Various cell phones displayed at a shop.Image via WikipediaThe Dealia's swimsuit catalog came in the mail for my teenage daughter and I handed it to my youngest son and asked him to take it to her. He padded in the den and I heard him say,

"Here's your bathing suit catalog, sis. Pick something that won't scar me for life!"

Scarred for life? lol. Hmmmm. Not a joke if I think about it.

Scarred for Life.
As I listened to my book on iPod and cleaned the kitchen, I started thinking that that is what is happening to many of today's teens.

We have driver's education because we want to protect kids from themselves. A car is a powerful machine and can kill.

We have sex education because we want to protect children as well. Sex is a very intimate thing that shouldn't be taken lightly. Sex can also kill if one contracts various STD's.

Cell phones and the Internet are powerful vehicles. Yet parents give kids cell phones like they are the latest gadget, ignoring what can happen if a child makes a childish mistake. They can be scarred for life.

Driver's education cannot stop accidents among teenagers - but well done - it can reduce them.

Sex education cannot stop sex among teenagers but it can prevent STD's and have students take it more seriously.

Digital citizenship education cannot STOP the headlines of people who do scarring things through improper use of their technology but I believe it can reduce them.

Margarite's Mistake
In the Saturday New York Times Article "A Girl's Nude Photo, and Altered Lives" ( a story we'll be talking about in Digiteen this week), Margarite is an eighth grader who posed nude in her mirror and sent the picture of herself to a popular athlete, Isaiah.

Isaiah forwarded this to a former friend of Margarite's who then forwarded it to every contact in her cell phone with the message:

"Ho Alert! If you think this girl is a whore, then text this to all your friends."

Pressed Send.

The video went viral and through four middle schools. When parents started calling in to complain, the Middle school principal at one school launched the investigation that led to the confiscation of student cell phones and three students being charged with dissemination of child pornography (a class C felony.)

The county prosecutor, Mr. Peters said, "The idea of forwarding that picture was bad enough," he said, "But the text elevated it to something far more serious. It was mean-girl drama, an all-out attempt to destroy someone without thinking about the implications."

As other kids left school to go home at the end fo the day, Isiah and Margarite's former friend were led off in handcuffs.

Scarred for life.

The article goes on to say that sexting (between adults) is protected first amendment speech and that many magazines are giving tips on "how to look good" in sexting photos. However, as many as 24 % of 14-17 year olders have been involved in "some type of naked sexting." (AP & MTV Poll - PDF)

Forwarding such photos can land you in jail.

Don't Freak Out, Fan Out
I think that banning cell phones and removing them from schools is NOT the right answer. You might as well dam the Mississippi in a few weeks during flood season. See if that will hold!

It would be like banning cars because too many kids die in traffic accidents. Not realistic. We have to co-exist with cars because they are part of our society and the way we get around.

Banning cell phones is not realistic. We must co-exist with cell phones because they are part of our society and the way we communicate.

When someone lost an earring in the grass the other day - we all took a small space and fanned out to find the earring and eventually did.

Likewise, we should all take the "plot of ground" assigned to us. Our classroom. Our Home. Our school. Our community.

We can't do it all but we can do something.

Don't Lecture, Learn.

This should be treated a lot like driver's education which does have a bit of classroom work but a lot of time IN a car navigating the spaces. If a kid is going to have a problem with a left turn or parallel parking you want them to have it under supervision so it is not scarring for life.

The final example from Facebook Friending 101 for Schools (about the student I named "Zipper) that I posted on Friday is from one of our Flat Classroom projects. (I did change the names.) The teachable moment that I discussed in that case study transformed our our kids and they all went in and changed their privacy settings.

Digital Citizenship in Situ
That is why I think effective digital citizenship education is done WHILE students are using educational networks (social networks for education) and cell phones. In fact, that is why we founded Digiteen and spun it off as a nonprofit - because we felt like the kids who came in to Flat Classroom weren't ready because they were clueless about managing their personal identity in safe, wise ways!

Kids DON'T get it, but neither do adults. We are learning as we go.

In fact, I received a SCATHING commenter accusing me of not knowing Facebook privacy settings because she says she has set lists to:

"I friend students. I also have a specific list just for them. This list is restricted so that they can't see:
- any of my default wall posts (unless I specifically select my "students" list, but even then when I post to that one, I ONLY post to students, so that my other friends can't see it)
- anything anyone posts on my wall
- any of my photo albums except for the one of my profile pics
- anyone on my friends list (you can even restrict that, it's just on the privacy screen under "Connecting on Facebook" rather than "Sharing on Facebook")
- any pages or anything else that I "like""

Now, I've got it on my personal PD list this week to check this out and learn if this is indeed the case. Furthermore, I want to test it and see if it actually works that way. I value commenters that let me know that there is more to be told.  

(Of course this commenter didn't do it in a very nice way and that, I feel was poor citizenship, but onwards and upwards - if we cannot learn from those who are unkind to us, then we are letting our emotions restrict our learning potential - aren't we? So, my friends, don't let your emotions on this topic cause you to make a decision not to learn either.)

If I wasn't on Facebook and wasn't blogging - how would I know? It is a MISTAKE to ignore Facebook. You should all also know how to send and receive text messages.

Case Study: Who is Mij Cosby?
I've changed this name because we don't really know if this is a real person or not. However, last week as my class and I were brainstorming our action project for Digiteen, a student said - we need to talk about friending because "WHO IS MIJ COSBY?"

I asked - WHAT?

He said -

"There is this girl over in an adjacent county who has no friends at her own school but who has asked to FRIEND every student at Westwood. I won't friend Mij because I don't know who it is."

We talked for some time and everyone in the class but one person (who said he needed a lot of friends) unfriended Mij because they realized that NO ONE knew who it was.

But I left the question on the board and didn't think another thing about it. My tenth graders came in and saw the board and several shouted out

"WHO is Mij Cosby? I mean really, Mrs. Vicki, who is it?"

They too had been friended - such was the whole day!! We don't know who this is, but what we found out happened is that this person was able to get about 5 kids to friend at our school and then everyone started friending Mij. In 2-3 days at least 50+ kids (that I counted) had friended Mij and NO ONE knew the person!

They admitted that they look to see how many mutual friends they have and then decide if they should friend or not.

Almost all of the students unfriended Mij because we cannot find ONE student in the whole school who knows her. NOT ONE. We don't even know if there is a family in that county of 2800 people with that last name! We think Mij is a fake.

And yet, several kids didn't want to unfriend. ("But I want to have a lot of friends, Mrs. Vicki.") And many didn't want to make their pages Friends only -- some have it set to public. ("I want people to know who I am.")

This live in-situ case study that happened because we were talking about what to DO about digital citizenship caused around 90+% of my students to change their behavior - at least for now. That did more to help them understand friending than anything else. Facebook is unblocked at school (at least for now) so they took action RIGHT THEN.

Get them talking and acting and learning and doing!


Time to Take Action
  • Does your school have to end up on the cover of the New York Times for you to take seriously the need for digital citizenship education?
  • Do you know that problems WILL happen and they will be WORSE if you ignore this issue?
  • Do you think lecture from a fear-based uneducated un-social-media-wise adult is actually going to change anything? Do you want a person without a driver's license who doesn't own a car teaching drivers ed? Get someone who uses this stuff and can relate to kids to lead them in educated discussions - or join something like Digiteen.
  • Do you think you have to find a place for this before you do it? We do what is important.
  • Do you think educating parents on proactive ways to help will do more than scaring them into taking away cell phones? Cell phones are the identity of many kids. Face it.
  • The best defense is a good offense. Are you going to be proactive or reactive? Which will paint you as more of a leader? Be a visionary, that is your job.
  • What are you doing? Share.
Remember your noble calling. Handle this situation with nobility and wisdom and resist the desire to freak out and create fear.

And also remember this, I'm bringing attention to social media in schools because it is IMPORTANT. I will continue to talk about this and share what I know - but if I don't know something (and there is tons I don't know) please feel free to shoot me an email at vicki at coolcatteacher dot com and teach me something. ;-)

You are great readers and sharers. Thank you.
Enhanced by Zemanta

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Facebook Photos: Your Delete Doesn't Mean "Delete"



"Even if you delete incriminating photos on your Facebook profile, the company is keeping them accessible to anyone online for up to 30 months.
The social networking site admitted it had been keeping deleted photos for a "limited" amount of time."  the age.com.au "Facebook keeps 'deleted' user photos for years by Ben Grubb.
Are you talking to students about the un-deletability of files?

We talk about how important it is to allow kids to fail. The problem with social media is a zero tolerance for failure. You mess up and your online presence or even employability may be gone forever. Just ask the Burger King sink bathtub guy or Steven Slater from Jet Blue Airline employee who flamed at passengers and had several videos go viral.

We use pencils when we want to let the kids erase and start over, but the Internet is most definitely in huge Sharpie permanent ink.

This brings up the point of taking kids into safe places with us where they can learn. Again, we have to examine the terms and conditions of those spaces to see if they are more responsible than facebook with their policy on photos, etc. I have, however, been hearing GREAT things about Edmodo and what they are doing in the educational space. My friends here in Maine are raving about them and their new interface and I plan on going back into the space for another look.

Some places we can't afford to let kids fail and need to help and guide them as they are learning.
Bring social-media-like spaces into schools and create educational network so that all children can understand how to use these tools, not just those who have Internet at home.
Enhanced by Zemanta

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Anne Collier: On-line Safety 3.0: Rethinking Net Safety Together






I was on-line planning the Citizenship, Gridizenship: Online Community Building for Self-Sustaining Safety at ISTE this year (Monday morning at 8:30 am!) with some amazing co-presenters (Anne Collier, Marianne Malmstrom and Bron Stuckey.) Marianne gave me the link to this presentation from Anne Collier and I've started watching and think this is something you should listen to in your on-line PD this week.


Today I asked a person just finishing her masters the most important thing she learned from her program and she said, "I learned that I can learn everything I need to know on-line."  Quite sage advice. But you've got to commit the time and go out and get it.  You don't get smarter by rubbing Einstein's head and a computer doesn't make you smarter either.  It is what you and where you tune those antennae. 

I first "met" Anne (author of Net Family News) when I saw her on the PBS Growing Up On-line video series we use for Digiteen.  Now, it is an honor to call her a friend.


About the talk:

Online Safety 3.0: Rethinking Net Safety Together


A March 2010 talk for educators given by ConnectSafely co-director Anne Collier (or rather her avatar, Anny Khandr) and edited by Knowclue Kidd (aka Marianne Malmstrom). Set in the underwater Paideia Coliseum in Second Life, Anny's talk was part of a series on digital citizenship and safety presented by Atlantis Seekers (http://atlantisseekers.ning.com). Its aim is to help educators break through the myths and hype about how youth are using social media and consider what we're learning from the growing bodies of both social-media and youth-risk research. (Anne is also founder and editor of NetFamilyNews.org.)
Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Friday, August 07, 2009

Better "Ask [Harvard] What You Can Do" They are going to own the trademark



Harvard UniversityImage via Wikipedia
This from Odd News:

Harvard University's
moves to seek U.S. trademarks for everyday phrases such as "Ask what
you can do" are defensive measures, a school official says.
What else are they trademarking?  "Lessons Learned" and "Managing Yourself" said the Boston Globe in their August first, 2009 Article.  It also has a pending application for "The world’s thinking."

The Boston Globe reports:

"Securing each trademark costs from $500 to $1,000 in the United States
and thousands more overseas, Calixto said. Legal disputes run up the
costs. Harvard pays for the effort with the more than $1 million in
royalties it earns each year from licensing its trademarks to such
entities as bookstores and mall kiosks selling Harvard apparel; about a
third of royalties go toward scholarships, he said."
To me, it is interesting, but also disconcerting.  I have a cousin who was in a music program at a public university and the university had them sign an agreement that stated all music created was property of the university and could not be resold or reused in any way.  The problem was, she and some friends created a really cool song (that I have on my ipod -- shhhh -don't tell) and it is stuck.  The University isn't going to do anything with it.

To me, colleges should be about the care and feeding of ideas --promotion of capitalism. But it seems that colleges and many educational organizations are becoming very much about making money -- you know, it is OK to sell collegiate attire, but it sure seems that this trademark thing is going pretty far -- who could keep up with it all?

What do you think?  Is it OK for Harvard (or other universities) to trademark such common phrases?  Do you feel differently if it was a public university spending all of these resources on trademarks of this type?

Oh, and if Veritas is sweating, Harvard knows that they are a software company and doesn't plan to pursue that one.  (Look at the shield above.)

Just not sure on his one in my own mind and looking for some of your thoughts!


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Monday, February 23, 2009

Why should I capitalize my i's? (And what to do about it)



OK, this is an issue that many students ask, "Why do i need to capitalize?" (I intentionally did that lowercase.)

Well, there is one main reason:

Not everyone speaks English.

Using a lowercase "i" and other things like "cu l8r" and "r u OK?" are part of a slang called "im-speak" or instant messaging speak because it developed to speed instant messaging. If you choose to use this in your personal communications, that is your choice.

But here, we are professional students and one day, you will be a professional of some kind. In that case, if you do not capitalize you will be judged as someone who doesn't care about your language.

But most importantly, IM speak is very rude to those who have English as a second language and so that just makes it poor Digital Citizenship. As a Digital Citizen, you want to be inclusive and helpful to others AND a good communicator. (Some who don't speak good English will also use things like Google Translate which WILL NOT properly translate things that aren't spelled correctly or capitalized.)

So, those of you who seem to be allergic to those shift keys to capitalize and the punctuation -- you'd better get over it. Correct language is important and good netiquette. If you want to have spellchecker built in, just use the Mozilla Firefox browser and it will spell check automatically. I use it ALL the time! Just right click on the words that are underlined in red and pick the correct spelling.


For the teachers, this is how I handle this:

1) I message them privately and tell them if it is not fixed that it will be points off.
2) If they don't fix, I leave a comment on the page to remind them and as a message to other students about capitalization and correct spelling.
3) This is VERY important because IM speak is rude to those who have English as a second language -- capitalization is VERY important and IM speak is VERY rude when those who aren't native English speakers are involved. Talk about it and use it as a teachable moment.

There is also some project guidelines that we use for all Flat Classroom projects at http://projecthelp.wikispaces.com/Citing+Personal+Information

Cross posted with my NetGenEd Project blog
Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Friday, November 07, 2008

See what the best colleges are doing about Open Access



I'm looking at the policies for Open Access coming down from Universities. (Add your institution to this growing list which also includes links to those repositories.)


 This one from the University of Southern California:

"University of California faculty shall routinely grant to The Regents of the University of California a license to place in a non-commercial open-access online repository the faculty member's scholarly work published in a scholarly journal or conference proceedings. In the event a faculty member is required to assign all or a part of his or her copyright rights in such scholarly work to a publisher as part of a publication agreement, the faculty member shall retain in the publication agreement the right to grant the foregoing license to the Regents. Faculty may opt out of this policy for any specific work or invoke a specified delay before such work appears in an open-access repository [in accordance with [an] opt-out mechanism set forth [in the policy]."
Stanford School of Education's Policy?

"Faculty members grant to the Stanford University permission to make publicly
available their scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those
articles. They grant to Stanford University a nonexclusive, irrevocable,
worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to
their scholarly articles, in any medium, and to authorize others to do the
same, provided that the articles are properly attributed to the authors not
sold for a profit.


The policy will apply to all scholarly articles authored or co-authored while
a faculty member of the School of Education, beginning with articles for which
the publisher's copyright agreement has yet to be signed. The Dean or the
Dean's designate will waive application of the policy upon written request
from faculty who wish to publish an article with a publisher who will not
agree to the terms of this policy (which will be presented to the publishers
in the form of an addendum to the copyright agreement).


No later than the date of publication, faculty members will provide an
electronic copy of the final version of the article at no charge to the
appropriate representative of the Dean of Education's Office, who will make
the article available to the public in an open-access repository operated by
Stanford University...."
I have a couple of thoughts:

  1. Although some faculty may be concerned, I think that when their research is available, if they do good work, it will increase their own "personal brand" or reputation in their field. 
  2. Every school on this list has increased their stature in my opinion just because they are looking at this issue.  It means they are on the cusp of change. 
  3. I don't see the specifications for student work.
Should student work be respected? 

This is what bothers me most.  My cousin is an audio engineer and has made some pretty great soundtracks.  However, according to the policy of her college, they OWN EVERYTHING she creates as part of her coursework.  This is a pretty common practice for film schools as well as any school where they create multimedia.

In Corynne McSherry's article "Film Schools Teacher Wrong Copyright Lesson" she hits on this very issue:

"Universities commonly use earnings from the licensing or sale of intellectual property to help cover their operating costs.?
UH has also said that it will use its rights to protect UH?s
reputation?in other words, to make sure students don?t go submitting
works to festivals, posting them on YouTube, sending them to
prospective employers, and so on, without UH permission. If any
university tried to control the release and distribution of a
professor?s latest book, such a policy would immediately be recognized
for the censorship that it is. Too bad that recognition doesn?t extend
to students."

She is discussing the policy of the University of Hawaii, and yet this is the policy of most schools I know.

Last week, the University of Arizona introduced an Office of Copyright Management and Scholarly Communication and a lot of this article has some great issues embedded in the quotations.  Here are a few:
"Over the last few years, GPSC has been trying to work with the administration on understanding what rights graduate and professional students have by way of dissertations, thesis work, productions and artwork," Bieda said.[Bieda is president of the Graduate and Professional Student council]

"For the most part, we are not legal scholars," he said. "What this office is going to do it to help us to understand what our legal rights are as students.
Additionally the office is pushing towards open source for scholarly works.  The University of Arizona is moving in the right direction as these are tough issues, both from the perspective of correctly quoting sources, receiving credit and getting permission as well as BEING correctly quoted, getting credit and giving permission.

This is a two way street that benefits us all, but the literal minefield that has emerged in the explosion of intellectual production has many schools responding with great walls of legalese that limit the work that their students, faculty, and others wish to do.

Just last week, a student from the first Flat Classroom project had her work taken down off youtube for copyright infringement of a song.  At the time, my students had complained that "they don't have the same rules that we do" because I wouldn't let them use copyrighted work. 

The work this student did is GONE because she didn't follow copyright, and to me, that is just punishment.

Sometimes teachers won't catch it, but we all use the same youtube.  Make a video without having the rights and, unless you keep a backup copy on your computer, your punishment WILL be deletion.  Your hard work will dissappear with no warning in bit dust without the opportunity to be retrieved.

Copyright is a huge issue, but it need not paralyze us.  And kudos to those organizations tackling this issue head on.  Surely, it will be  a sore issue with faculty, some of whom don't even know how to check email, but it is one that should be discussed.

I want to see students have the copyright for their own work as there are great works that are gathering dust on the shelf that aren't being marketed to the world by a college who has no clue as to what they have.  It is kind of like the end of the first Indiana Jones movie where the Ark of the Covenant is rolled into a huge warehouse and put in a crate.

There's gold in that college warehouse of multimedia. 

Open Access... yes.

Student Copyright and Credit... something that needs to happen too!



Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Monday, November 03, 2008

Let's get kids out of Google Images and into Good, Free, Legal Photos



I echo Grumpy Old Teacher's sentiments exactly when he says:

Again I say, let's get our students (and colleagues) to stop using
Google Images, and get some real quality images into their work!

Amen to that, grumpy!

Suggestions, including one new one:
  1. Every Stock Photo -- Free search Engine for stock photos including the ability to critique and share your photos.  What a great idea. (from Grumpy)
  2. Flickr Storm - (Also from Grumpy)
  3. Creative Commons Search - I've been using the built in creative commons searches in Firefox to find ours. (This is what we use.)
What are your places for good, high quality, free photos? 

Monday, September 08, 2008

A Little Digital Citizenship Parent Brainstorming: Share Your Thoughts



Brainstorming with Mindmeister.  This is a cool mind mapping tool!  The task at hand -- digital citizenship tips for parents.  So, what is left out?  (And if you give suggestions, please let me know if you allow permission to include in an article I'm writing.)  Will also be perusing thoughts at Advocates for Digital Citizenship, Safety & Success.

This is a rough map, but as I work on it and update -- you'll see it change here. 

As you are parenting your digitally savvy teen or child, what works for you?

Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Upcoming Events & PD w/ Me (and others)



Here are some upcoming events (some free and some not) I'd like to share with you. All of them have live elements that you may want to join!

Sounding Board Informational Meeting
Kim Cofino
Wed April 30th at 11:00 am UTC (see local times here). You can access the session via the link on the Sounding Board page. There is still time to sign up your classroom to be a peer review classroom for the horizon project.

Innovative Uses of Technology in the Classroom
Friday, May 2nd 10:30 am - Noon EDT
Free Ustream of Panel Discussion
This Friday, May 2nd, I'm very excited to be at Princeton this Friday at "Students and Electronic Media: Teaching in the Technological Age"on a panel with Kevin Jarrett (about Second Life) and Daniel McVeigh (Ocean of Know). I'll be ustreaming our panel and we'll have a backchannel chat (check my blog Friday morning for instructions)

If you're near Princeton, this is free and registration is still open. (I think.) See the agenda here. (Kathy Schrock and some other amazing people will be there too!)

Planning Meetings for Online Course for Digital Citizenship
Wednesday, April 30 12:30 pm CST (1:30 EDT)
Thursday, May 1 7:30 pm CST (8:30 EDT)
Kate Olson is hosting two "planning" / idea meetings about the opportunity to create a free course for parents, students, and anyone interested in learning more about digital citizenship, safety, and success. Elluminate links are posted at the Ad4dcss blog.

The First In-Person Flat Classroom "Course" with Julie Lindsay and me
Tuesday, July 8 - Wednesday, July 9th
See full schedule.
Yes, we will ustream some of this (probably the opening and closing) but the rest of the time, I hope you can understand, Julie and I will be focusing on those who are attending.

We've talked for two and a half years now about truly sharing and teaching what it takes to "do" a true Flat Classroom/ Horizon Project collaboration. Honestly, if the movement is going to grow (as it is), it will require many more teachers and schools understanding how it works and doing it themselves. Truly sustainable, culture altering movements such as we believe flat classroom should be, cannot be monopolized by anyone. The shifting world-view that we see in our students needs to be shared with others.

This arose out of a discussion I had with Steve Hargadon at IL-TCE about how Julie and I wanted to do this but didn't have the time to plan it... so Steve, who always does things up to the standards that Julie and I also aspire to, is planning this event for us.

And Elizabeth Helfant in St. Louis has Julie and I spending some special time with her school and selected schools in her association on Monday and is letting us continue on in her amazing facilities through Tuesday and Wednesday. We've created a wiki and will be sharing what we do for this on an ongoing basis. (If you're interested, registration information is available on the wiki. Who knows if we will do this again, but this time will be very, very special.)

NECC Presentations

Edubloggercon

Saturday, June 28th
I wouldn't miss it for the world. This is my favorite PD event FOR ME! Listen and learn from many amazing people. I'll never forget last year as Julie and I were talking, having met for the first time and Jeff Utecht from China plops down in the seat between us. Talk about amazing moments!

Wikispaces

Monday, June 30 8:30 am - 9:30 am at NECC
Adam Frey, cofounder of wikispaces and I will share updated information on wikispaces and I'll talk about how we use the site in projects.

Exploring Classroom 2.0 Panel
with Steve Hargadon
Monday, June 30 12:30 - 1:30 pm, NECC

Flat Classroom "Birds of a Feather"
Monday, June 30 2:00 - 3:00 pm NECC
Join Julie and I as we facilitate discussions between people interested in creating "flat classroom" style projects. We will be grouping you in ways to facilitate meaningful connections.

Flat Classroom "Mini" 3 hour workshop
Wednesday, July 2, 8:30 am - 12:30 pm
For those going to NECC, Julie and I are doing a workshop on Wednesday Morning sponsored by SIGTel. There are some slots still open, I think. We will work to include external participants in some of the work as well via ustream and wiki. Stay tuned.

Panel Discussion on Viral Professional Development
Wednesday, July 2, 1:30 - 2:30 pm (San Antonio Time)
We've been planning this for some time and will be putting the finishing touches on this exciting panel discussion over the next several weeks. This WILL be ustreamed AND backchanneled.

Please say "hi"
The toughest thing about these conferences is in finding the sufficient time to give a decent "hello." I hope if you say "hi" that you'll have your business card in hand a note on the back about anything you'd like to discuss in the future. I try to make these notes myself but am notoriously without a pen (perhaps why I type everything.) We may then be in touch via e-mail later.

Take time to say "hi" and know that I'll do my best to take a minute. I do so love meeting other people just like me. I look forward to these events like edubloggercon and the Flat Classroom workshop where we'll be able to kick back and spend a little more time in conversation.

tag: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, April 18, 2008

What are the 10 best videos for promoting educational change?





We are working to add the 10 BEST videos on educational change to the wiki. What are they? Where should they go (looking for the best on each topic.)

When we give people these videos, we're giving them something that helps them "sell" what they are doing . I suggest showing these videos for professional development, school boards, and anyone who cares about education.

We've started a page for your nominations for the best videos. If we get too many, we may have some sort of voting thing (which would be great to have that much interest!)

tag: , , , , ,

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Take a look at what has happened in 72 hours.



a cross post at the Advocates for Digital Citizenship, Safety, and Success blog

Since this project is now 72 hours old, I thought we'd give a few stats for what is happening!

  • We have 27 people signed up on the Advocates public list.
  • 16 Readers for our Blog (Feed set up 24 hours a go.)
  • Over 1200 views of the wiki, with 70 edits, and visits from 9 countries and more than 300 unique visitors and 64 members.
  • 74 bookmarks sent to the diigo group with 40 members.
  • 52 members of the Google Group with 24 discussions being tossed around
  • Slowly percolating in the blogosphere with 7 posts so far. We can do better than this, maybe some people are waiting a bit.
  • Lots of tweets beginning to share although I must admit a few of us are hogging the tweets.
  • A logo design and another on the way for us to share and discuss.
  • A set of tags for sharing and facilitating exchange of data and links
  • An aggregation page for all of this (it is my personal launch page to start this.)

Two projects that are gaining steam and volunteers:
  1. I Read Blocked Blogs Awareness Day/Week - as part of the digital access aspect.
  2. A Professional Development Class to train people on the 9 digital citizenship topics -- Still forming. The hosting for the Moodle has been facilitated by the great people at Professional Learning Board.
What I'm seeing is that people are just joining in with what fits best with their daily tasks and vision.

I'd really like to see some people begin talking about creating a flyer or handout on Digital Access, which is the first of the 9 aspects of Digital Citizenship as we have outlined on the wiki.

What can you do?
Well, we're really trying to compile things now. I need a little help on the wiki for someone who understands RSS and also, we need some people to start putting thumbs up on the links coming through diigo so they'll start having more meaning. (Our way of "vetting" the sources.)

Will you take 5 minutes and go through some of the links and add your thumbs up -- if you see an important link missing, please send it to the group AND use the tagging standard we've set up, in addition to any other tags you wish to add!

Thank you for caring. This will probably be my last full cross-post on Cool Cat Teacher, if you want to follow this effort closely, please subscribe to the Ad4dcss group blog.

Beware of numbers
I'd rather have 1 committed person than 100 people just putting their names down, and that is what we've got. We've got some amazing, hard working, very BUSY people who don't have a lot of time, just bookmarking a little smarter and tweeting and talking towards a common purpose.

The Cat on the Hot Stove
Some, I think have the cat on the hot stove syndrome.

If a cat sits on a hot stove, he jumps up. The only problem is that he will not ever sit on the stove again... not even a cold one.

I think that so many of us have gotten involved in something just to see it peter out. Just to see it go "poof." So, we don't want to get all involved and invested in another "poof project." We just won't sit on the stove!

Well, if I'm trying again, so can you. I've jumped headlong into thing that went "poof" before too, however, I will say this... every time I have, I've come away with more learning and meeting new people. Even the "poof" projects haven't been to waste.

However, I'm going to predict something. I believe that there are going to be some newcomers on this project who are going to become well known very fast because of their amazing efforts. I'm already seeing it.

If you're a beginner and you don't know where to start... our virtual volunteerism and cooperative efforts as educators are just now getting started. Join in where you see fit. And if you really want to be "in the know" sign up for the Google group and get our daily digest.

On my to do list is to e-mail some amazing bloggers that I know. I've really been waiting until we have all of our wiki edited, feeds coming in and people's names on the list and going so that when we approach the disillusioned who've been doing this a lot longer than I, that they'll know that there is something here.

Teaching is a noble calling and this is a noble cause. This is a connecting point. A facilitation and linking in a common cause to help us. This is grassroots organizing. We want to see you as a part of it!

tag: , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Advocate Action is Heating Up



simulpost with Advocates 4 Digital Citizenship, Safety, and Success blog

Just a quick update on this. I'll still keep my focus over here, but we're starting a group blog that I think will end up being much bigger than I. We're looking for a few passionate bloggers to join the group over there with me. Drop me a line!

We've created one page to monitor all of the activities for this project - http://www.netvibes.com/coolcatteacher#Ad4dcss

Where we're sharing
  • We've also got a wiki started at http://ad4dcss.wikispaces.com
  • The wiki uses the links we create in diigo and feeds the resources to the 9 major categories of digital citizenship that we're addressing. (See wiki for those.)
  • We have a diigo group for bookmarking. at http://groups.diigo.com/groups/Ad4dcss
  • This blog is where we'll list major announcements AND resource links, so it will be a good place to follow the activities.
Where YOU can volunteer
  • We have a donated Moodle space and Kate Olson is organizing an online course done BY educators for people wanting to know more about Digital Citizenship, Safety, and Success. We are planning a preliminary meeting within the next 7 days, however, we're discussing using the 9 areas of digital citizenship as posted on the wiki to serve as our starting point.

  • We're working on a logo and have a volunteer who is working on this.

  • Wiki Work - We're working on pulling in the diigo links RSS to the wiki page so that the diigo group will automatically feed the bookmarks to the appropriate category. We could use some help putting those RSS's on the page. (Much of this is being done w/ people giving 30 minutes here and there.)

    I would personally love to see the wiki have some basic information, but remember, we're working to create things to go offline so it is about resources, handouts, and useful things.

  • THE BIG THING YOU CAN DO NOW! - Besides telling people about this (include ad4dcss in the twitter or blog post and it will aggregate on our netvibes page so we'll know you're there.)

    We NEED people to join the Diigo group and USE THE STANDARD TAG DICTIONARY. We also need people to go through the bookmarks and thumbs up or thumbs down the best resources so that we may start using that feature. This will sort of be our way of "vetting" the sources.

    If you could spend just 10 minutes going through your bookmarks on digital citizenship and tagging them.
We're also talking about several action days a year about different points and I know a lot of you have already broached this subject. Access, digital safety, blogging, so many different things we could do.

Is this some sort of political thing?
Well, honestly, we don't know what this is yet. Any organization of people that becomes effective ends up having a political impact, however, we're not starting off that way.

We're starting off to create useful things to help YOU take the discussion of these tools offline. Handouts for boards of directors. An online class for anyone to take who wants to become educated.

When we have large numbers of people, then we'll have more clout on the political end.

But for now, we have a growing list of charter members who are going to tweet, bookmark, do a little wiki work, and share their ideas.

How do "we" decide where to move?

I think that some fresh faces no one has ever heard of will emerge to lead the charge on some things that we'll sit back and say "now why didn't we do that before."

So, what my role is that when there is a group of people who says to me "we want to do this," I'm using the reach and network of mine to help facilitate and give them the resources to make it happen (and a little geeky programming stuff in the background.)

Power of Newcomers!
Newcomers are perfect for this effort because they more clearly see the obstacles that are holding newcomers from joining in and learning more. They clearly see the other side of the fence because they can remember the other side of the fence.

I wish I had more time to tell you more.

We are looking for a few more group bloggers. So, join in. Speak up. Share.

tag: , , , , ,

My Phone Call to You: Why we need to Advocate for Digital Citizenship, Safety and Success



I just set up a gcast podcast channel. I don't have time to record and edit podcasts, but gcast lets me make phone calls to you and that is what I did last night.

I wanted to give you insight into why we need Advocates for Digital Citizenship, Safety, and Success and a little background on some of the people involved in the initial conversations as well as my ideas for what may need to happen.

I hope you'll listen.

Monday, April 14, 2008

My passion is quilted in these letters: ad4dcss



Since I have not yet responded to the Passion Quilt Meme, I've been prompted yet again. This seems a time to unleash my biggest passion for teaching today's students.

Forgive me, I may get emotional.

My heart breaks for these parents who are struggling with the kidnapping and beating of their child for the sake of Youtube popularity.



This news show outlines what happens and talked to a psychologist.



My Prediction
We have a small window of opportunity to suggest and create structures of what WE, the educators who use these technologies, suggest we should do about the whole digital citizenship, safety, and success issue.

Then, we will be TOLD what to do because of our lack of action. And we know how that goes.

This came up Sunday Morning, when many of us came together in a little impromptu meeting with Sue Waters and Al Upton in elluminate (I'll post the link to the recording when it is released.) These are the brainstorming whiteboard pages (unedited). NOte that there are a lot of things on there WE WOULDN't do, but sharing the brainstorming screen will help summarize the things we talked about.











A lot of us are passionate about it. And we're sick of "talk" about cooperation on the matter.

So, here is what we have:

  • A Google Group to serve as an easy-to join e-mail based network for discussing what we're doing. I suggest subscribing to a DAILY DIGEST to prevent getting too much e-mail. For now, the group is named Advocates for Digital Citizenship, Safety, and Success.
  • A "tag" to serve as our focal point to "collect the conversation - ad4dcss
  • Everything updated is being put on the Conversation Aggregator page I created on Netvibes. (Note: This comes from some comments from Jon Becker and Kate Olson -- wishing that we could "control" and aggregate a conversation. This page is being set up to track all of the things tagged ad4dcss. We cannot control the conversation but we can certainly work to include newcomers and ANYONE interested in the topic... even the Non-Geeks. And this was important enough to set up the tags and tracking.)

Why did we pick that?
Well, it sort of came up as an accident and aggregation of everyone's thoughts, but it stands for Advocates for Digital Citizenship, Safety, and Success.

We're beginning to pull together some activities, much of which will just happen from the fact that everything is aggregated! If you us ad4dcss in your twitter post it goes to the netvibes page and I've found that the most useful thing so far!

Some things already spotting through this new looking glass are:
  • Parents as Partners discussion tonight about how to educate parents with students at www.edtechtalk.com - 8 pm EST
  • Professional Learning Board is helping us set up a Moodle Training site for Advocates and others interested in this topic -- we need some volunteers to help Kate set it up.
  • Group blog - This is for those who want to share discussions around this topic. If you're interested, contact Vicki by leaving a comment here. It is meant to be a resource for Advocates and those interested in this topic.
  • We will have some upcoming impromptu and planned sessions. If you want to hold a session and you have an elluminate room or online place to "meet" -- let me know and I'll give you some talking points of groups that are forming.

Current action items are:

  • Listen to the elluminate recording
  • Ask educators interested in forming a grassroots organization to promote online AND OFFLINE action advocating digital citizenship, safety, and success to join this group - http://groups.google.com/group/ad4dcss
  • Join the Diigo Group to share links (See http://digiteen.wikispaces.com for the categories UNTIL group is set up.)
  • Anything you write about the ideas for organizing -- what needs to be done! Tag it ad4dcss if you twitter it type #ad4dcss
  • Join an upcoming discussion or plan to host one. Add them to our Google Calendar page (to be posted soon.)

Current ideas under ACTIVE discussion

  • Global Action Days ("Flash Point" Projects) - eVents, Student projects, bringing out the student voice en masse on these topics.
  • Develop of a curriculum wiki by teachers on these topics
  • Online professional development
  • Talking points documents that may be printed and shared offline to administrators, boards, teachers, etc.
OK, so my question to you is this. Do you want to be an advocate? We are focusing on sharing resources ONLINE so that we may all be more effective OFFLINE. We've got to take this out.

We all have different areas and ways that we may share, so share in the way you feel most comfortable.

Hinges of History
But I'm going to say something here. Some of my favorite books are the Hinges of History books.

We swing upon a hinge of history at this moment. IF you are online now and getting comfortable with this technology, there is a reason. And it is probably so that you may do your part to advocate wise, safe, successful use of the Internet in your area.

We are all too busy and can work together to create materials and other things to do this. If you want to be an advocate, for now, we're open for anyone signing up as long as you want to join in the conversation AND spend a little time ACTING on it. Find a group, organize a group -- ACT.

I'm busy too, everyone. But, I've already bought the domain names and am going to let this be my "virtual volunteerism" project.

Perhaps we are made for a moment such as this. But I'm telling you, I'm tired of this happening and ready for some SUSTAINED efforts on this area.
If we don't do it, people who don't understand the Internet nor our students will tell us what we will be doing.

In five years when you are implementing those edicts, don't come complaining if you didn't at least try.

The debate over the word "digital"

Now, there has been some debate over the word "digital citizenship" and "digital literacy" because after all aren't these subsets of citizenship and literacy. My answer is, OF COURSE THEY ARE.

However, at this point, the mass of educators has not yet understood nor accepted the fact that they are a subset and for that reason, now, we are stuck appending the words "citizenship" and "literacy" with the words digital so that we may be clear in our meaning and laser focused in our efforts.

Maybe someone can debate that elsewhere, but I believe we need to birth some cooperative efforts that will accomplish something.

So, what do you think AND what do you want to do. What are your friends talking about "doing." Let's not just do SOMETHING but do the RIGHT THING, in effective, meaningful, thought out ways.

So, I guess I should tag some people for the passion quilt meme that I hijacked for something I'm really passionate about: Kate Olson, Jon Becker, Sue Waters, Alfred Thompson, and Vicky Hennigan (another newcomer) AND anyone else who wants to!!!

Who's joining in? Who's already doing things? Let's get it started!

tag: , , , , , , , ,


The Rules

  1. Think about what you are passionate about teaching your students.

  2. Post a picture from a source like FlickrCC or Flickr Creative Commons or make/take your own that captures what YOU are most passionate about for kids to learn about…and give your picture a short title.
  3. Title your blog post “Meme: Passion Quilt” and link back to this blog entry.

  4. Include links to 5 folks in your professional learning network or whom you follow on Twitter/Pownce etc.
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Disqus Comments for Cool Cat Teacher Blog